Sci-Fi-O-Rama

The Model Shop Part 1: Star Dwellers sculpture by Grant Louden + interview (with Dan McPharlin)

Jan 26th, 2014 | Categories: Art | Concept Art | Dan McPharlin | Illustration | Models | Retro

Grant Louden 'The Star_Dwellers' Interviewed By Dan McPharlin

Welcome to Sci-Fi-O-Rama 2014.

Here we begin with a totally exclusive feature courtesy of both Grant Louden & Dan McPharlin.

So without ado lets hand over the controls to Dan…


Guest post by Dan McPharlin

And now for something a little bit different. Sci-Fi-O-Rama doesn’t normally feature 3D work, but Kieran has kindly handed me the keys and let me loose on his blog to write this guest post on a subject that is very dear to my heart; Sci-Fi model making.

Ever since I first saw that monolithic Star Destroyer swoop majestically into frame in the opening minutes of Star Wars it’s a subject I’ve been fascinated by. While CGI has unfortunately all but rendered the model-maker’s craft obsolete in the movies, there are still a handful of talented artists out there burning the torch for this fantastic art form…

While trawling the dark recesses of Tumblr one evening late last year, I came upon an intriguing image. It seemed to be a model of the spacecraft from one of my favourite Colin Hay paintings Star Dwellers. A few google queries later and I discovered that I was looking at the work of artist Grant Louden, who after a successful career in advertising and graphic design has been quietly working away on a series of amazing sculptures based on classic spacecraft paintings by the likes of Tony Roberts, Peter Elson, and Colin Hay. Star Dwellers is Grant’s first finished build, and he has meticulously documented the process over on his website.

Grant Louden ‘The Star Dwellers’ interviewed By Dan McPharlin

(Above right © 1978 Colin Hay)

Painted in 1978 by Colin Hay using gouache and airbrush ink, The Star Dwellers was first used as the cover for a reprint of James Blish’s 1961 novel (hence the title). In 1979 it was published in the Terran Trade Authority book Space Wreck to accompany the story Victims of Space. Although relegated to a corner of the page, there is something about the vibrant colour scheme, composition and spooky atmosphere that draws one deeper into the painting. The ship is typical of Hay’s work at the time; although small in scale it is rendered in much the same fashion as many of the planet-sized behemoths that frequent his paintings, its jutting angular surfaces are plastered with all manner of multi-coloured inlets, panels and graphical symbols. The ship’s lifeless crew seem to be tethered to their sepulchral machine, destined to spend eternity drifting slowly through space, suspended in their moment of expiration. This macabre scene forms a striking silhouette against a vibrant yellow airbrushed sun.

In Space Wreck the ship is described as a maintenance scooter that had been used in desperation to escape a deadly virus outbreak aboard the research ship, Ceres. When faced with the prospect of an agonising death aboard the Ceres the two astronauts elected instead to perish swiftly in open space. I haven’t read James Blish’s The Star Dwellers so I can’t comment on the connection of art to story in that case. It should be noted that much of the art featured in the TTA books was ‘recycled’ from previous sci-fi book covers and generally a story was woven around the art, instead of the other way round.

Anyway, back to Grant’s spectacular model work. What particularly impressed me was his attention to detail in bringing the tiny craft and its crew into three-dimensional space. From the initial drawings through to early mock-ups and final build, there is a level of care and craftsmanship that you rarely see with these sort of projects. Of particular note are the wiring looms, harnesses, oxygen tanks and air hose fixtures; small details that are never seen in the original painting. Grant also consulted directly with Colin Hay during the build which no doubt added to the authenticity of the final product and surely gets him a few extra brownie points. But rather than me rambling on any further, let’s hear from Grant.


Q: Grant, first of all tell us a bit about your background. Where did you grow up, and what kindled your enthusiasm for science fiction and model making?

I was born in rural New Zealand, and raised on a dairy farm. Farm life, though pleasant enough, never held much of an attraction for me. But farm machinery did. As a kid I was always butchering my dinky toy cars and trucks and fashioning them into new mad creations.

I built 1/25th scale model truck kits for a few years. Then 1977 came along, and with it ‘Star Wars’, and everything changed. As Dan said above, that opening shot of the star destroyer opened up new synapses in the brain that led to a lifelong passion for science fiction, and in particular spacecraft and model making. Dreams changed to becoming a professional SFX model maker, but New Zealand in the 70’s was no place to be looking for that kind of work, so I built kitsets and my own creations. Then came ‘Alien’ a couple of years later, and with it The Book of Alien, which featured a load of Chris Foss designs for the Nostromo that were never used, but I fell in love with. I used to browse second hand book shops, not for the novels but their cover art. So I was aware of this genre of brash, bold, colourful British SF illustration. The mad-glorious designs and shapes, and the wild industrial/commercial colour schemes. I always thought they would make fantastic subjects for model replicas, but I never had the time, money or equipment to attempt such builds.

Q: How did the Star Dwellers project come about?

Fast forward 30 years and I’m now living in Milton Keynes, England. I’d been working in graphic design here, taken citizenship and settled down with my Irish wife. Sadly she was struck down with MS and I eventually gave up work to care for her full time. In my free time I had begun buying back all my old TTA books from the 70’s on Ebay. Then Chris Foss had released a new comprehensive book of his life work and I had the spacecraft bug back again. And this time the time, experience and equipment to realise that teenage dream of actually building them.

I met Chris at a book signing in London and showed him some artist’s renderings I’d done of his spacecraft as 3 dimensional sculptures. He was, in his words, “wildly, wildly enthusiastic” about my plans to recreate them. I contacted Colin Hay, Tony Roberts, and the late Peter Elson’s sister, who all agreed to me licensing a couple of their spacecraft paintings to turn into actual large scale sculptures / replicas. (I still don’t know exactly how to refer to them).

Colin’s Star Dwellers had always been an absolute favourite of the TTA spacecraft and was an easy choice for my first build. I sent him impressions of what I imagined a sculpture of his ship would look like, and he agreed straight away.

Grant Louden ‘The Star Dwellers’ interviewed By Dan McPharlin

Q: I understand that you produced the sculpture with Colin Hay’s official endorsement. In fact he was a source of information and advice on the build. How did you find the process of working directly with the original artist?

So we agreed an official license for each ship, and a royalty to go back to the original artist upon any sales for use of their work. It was important for me to recognise, celebrate, and remunerate their original – in every sense of the word – artworks.

I chose to build Star Dwellers first, for a couple of reasons. It was always my all time favourite of the TTA illustrations. Solemn, sombre and begging questions, and beautifully designed and rendered. Also it posed a considerable challenge. Just one view to work from, an incredibly complex shape to reproduce, with it’s wild angles merging into a round nose cone, and intricately detailed. And two astronaut figures to model, so in doing this first I would gather and hone the skills and equipment needed to build any of the others.

Colin was absolutely fantastic to work with throughout the entire build. From commenting on prototype paper models, checking plan drawings, and constant enthusiasm and kind comments all along the way. He was invaluable when it came to building the unseen details of the ship. What would the interior look like for instance? Independently we had both been thinking WWII fighters and midget submarines as a look and feel. I asked if we should put floating seat harnesses in the cockpits, and Colin said indeed and wished he’d thought of them when doing his original painting. So it was wonderful to have so much input and encouragement, and it’s made for a far more accurate and sympathetic recreation. Colin will be signing a Certificate of Authenticity to accompany the piece when sold, as well as a signed art print of his original. And I’ll be passing on a two figure percentage royalty when it’s sold.

Q: What materials did you use for the build?

Styrene plastic sheet is my medium. As easy to work as paper card or balsa wood, but solid and able to be fashioned into any shape imaginable. And of course model kitset parts, the “greeblies” that bring such models to life, bond perfectly to the plastic sheeting. Apart from that I used some steel wire for the pneumatic hose support legs, and FIMO modelling clay to make the astronauts and details like leather seat cushions. A few fine details were bought from specialist model shops. Tiny scale rubber hoses and wiring, and the seat harnesses were a set of 1/12th scale F1 safety belts.

The philosophy for it’s creation was always ‘hand-crafted’ wherever I could. In fact I bought a Dremmel hobby power drill, but as yet have not used it once, instead using small hand drills, scalpel knives, files and sandpaper. Isopon car body filler is also an excellent medium for sculpting and carving forms that flat plastic can’t recreate.

I also built a vacuum forming unit for moulding sheet plastic into round and complex forms. I made moulds of the astronaut figures in silicone rubber and recast them in resin, just to learn the skills, and in case I ever build a copy of this ship.

Grant Louden ‘The Star Dwellers’ interviewed By Dan McPharlin

Q: How long was the build time, and what what was the most challenging part?

Please don’t ask how long this one took! It was two years from conception to completion, but that is working very irregularly. I also had a recurring eye complaint that left me unable to work for a couple of months! But I would estimate if doing full time would have been about three to four months solid work, with the workshop equipment design and building that went with it.

The most challenging part was extrapolating three dimensions from the single view I had to work from. I did a few rough sketches of what I imagined the top and interior would look like and with a few comments from Colin was able to make paper card models to check the shapes, then onto full size plan drawings.
The battle damaged wings and fins also posed a problem. How to make the joins neat and tidy, not soldered, but still be robust enough to be handled? I used hollow plastic tubing, 2mm diameter, and inserted copper rods to give them rigidity. That way I got the strength of wire and the neat joins of plastic.

Q: In Colin’s painting, the geometry of the ship is rather strange with some difficult angles. Did you have a hard time extrapolating these into three dimensions?

By far the most difficult part was working out the overall form, and executing the transition from round nose cone to angular midships section. I built three small paper model prototypes till I got it right, with help from Colin in honing the shapes. The nose was made using a flat card skeleton cross section and filling it with filler and sanding down the shape to match the plans. I then made hollow moulds from these using heat formed plastic sheeting so that I was always working with the same material throughout. Then it was a matter of carefully measuring and cutting and bending panels to integrate the round nose to the rest of the hull. All done by eye and careful measuring. Like a three dimensional jigsaw, where you have to make each individual piece on the go.

Grant Louden ‘The Star Dwellers’ interviewed By Dan McPharlin

Q: Are there any venues where we’ll get to see your work?

I am planning on exhibiting several ships at Loncon 3, the World Science Fiction Convention in London, August this year.

Q: Are there any model-makers past or present whose work you particularly admire?

Martin Bower was always my favourite model maker. I came across his name in ‘Alien’ and slavered over his Nostromo and other models in that movie, and ‘Outland’. And of course unbeknownst at the time I’d been admiring his work on all those Gerry Anderson shows since childhood. (Dan’s note: Also be sure to check out the fantastic Alien Makers documentaries by Dennis Lowe – a must watch for any fan of Alien and model building)

The other is Gerald Wingrove, who has for decades been hand crafting the most exquisite 1/10th scale model cars from metal. Though he works in totally different subjects and materials to me, his work has long been an inspiration and byword for craftsmanship.

Grant Louden ‘The Star Dwellers’ interviewed By Dan McPharlin

Grant Louden ‘The Star Dwellers’ interviewed By Dan McPharlin

Where’s the best place to follow your builds online, and what will be your next project?

I’ve created a comprehensive build diary for this ship at my website. There are 24 pages of the entire process from plan drawings to finished piece. My next build is a Tony Roberts ship, used in OMNI magazine in the 80’s, called From Ruination’s Fires. It’s just passed the paper model stage and about to go into production any day. You can follow progress on that one here.

I also have a Facebook page – 70s Spaceship Replicas – where there are duplicate progress photos and current news.

Many thanks Grant!

Many thanks Dan and Kieran, for giving me the opportunity to display my first piece to a wider and, in SF terms, wiser audience! (Grant Louden)

Luke Wyatt – Sad Stonewash (a Video Mulch)

Oct 25th, 2013 | Categories: Animation | Art | Fantasy | Graphics | Psychedelic | Retro | Weird

It’s rare to come across a piece of art that really moves me. This odyssey of distortion does just that.

Unnerving, strangely touching and certainly one of the most spellbinding and hallucinatory 5 minutes of music video your ever likely to see. This is but a taster of Luke Wyatt’s ‘Sad Stonewash’ (a Video Mulch) a 40 minute sojourn into the abyss of VHS.

“Video Mulch” is Wyatt’s trademark form of extreme analog Video Processing, created using a combo of outdated analogue and digital tools.

Wyatt describes the process as thus:

“I select video to appropriate based on its mood resonance or compositional zing. My VCR gets beat up with a size 13 docksider until it makes errors and the VHS tape spits up on itself. While digitizing the video I induce the computer to make mistakes by not telling it the truth about the data it is ingesting. I isolate the mistakes I like best, outline them, and send them back to my VCR, resuming the docksider attack, repeating this process until things attain an anti-sheen, losing any crisp edge, as if they had always belonged together. I then arrange the images in an order that must appear equally inevitable.”

Not only did Wyatt forge this astonishing visual experience he also scored the haunting, melancholic soundtrack. Refreshingly far-out and very raw I highly recommend checking out his Torn Hawk project, a link to a recent live set.

Though they should of course be seen in motion here’s a few frames to demonstrate just how rich this garbled alien tapestry is.

Luke Wyatt 'Video Mulch'

Luke Wyatt 'Video Mulch'

Luke Wyatt 'Video Mulch'

Luke Wyatt 'Video Mulch'

For more on Luke Wyatt visit either his website: lukewyatt.net or his youtube channel youtube.com/user/lukeriot.

To purchase a copy of the recently released Sad Stonewash DVD visit earcave.mybisi.com/product/valcrond002

Selected Sci-Fi & Fantasy Book Covers Part 1

May 6th, 2013 | Categories: Adrian Chesterman | Art | Barbara Remmington | David Pelham | Dean Ellis | Fantasy | Graphics | Horror | Ian Miller | Illustration | Peter Max | Peter Tybus | Retro

'Nightmare Blue' Art by Justin Todd 1975

Zipping up my moonboots and going back to the roots here with a varied selection of retro SF and Fantasy book art. Sci-Fi-O-Rama was pretty much built upon the back of posting forgotten book and games art, so with a renaissance in blog activity what better than to revisit the archives and excerpt another sampler.

What’s most fascinating with each of these examples is though the whole might not always fully hit the mark there’s always something of interest or worthy for reference. This then might be a style of colouring, a technique in rendering, the choice and application of a typeface, or even something as obscure as the design of a motif. In short even the most subtle fragment of detailing can flick a creative switch, it’s all about your own imagination. That isn’t however to say that every Sci-Fi book cover has merit – au contraire – they most certainly do not. But that’s what we’re here for, to filter and serve only the very finest…

In putting this (abridged) selection together we’re go revisit several of the artists featured at Sci-Fi-O-Rama before, people who defined and shaped the genre such as David Pelham, Dean Ellis, Ian Miller and others perhaps slightly less well known such Adrian Chesterman or Peter Tybus. The majority of covers here have come via my Flickr favourites feed and prior to that a Flickr group I’ve mentioned before, the simply titled ‘Sci-Fi Books‘ pool. Of course these days with tumblr and pinterest and the ever evolving Google image search theres a multitude of ways to sophistically search for this kind of art, but I would say the crowd sourced ‘Sci-Fi Books’ collection still represents the best entry point. As such I recommend that as the first stop on the road for further research.

Lets begin with the art and notes, starting with the header image….

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‘Nightmare Blue’ Art by Justin Todd 1975 (top of post)

As is customary I always load the post head with the most arresting image of the pack, so what to say about this one? Hmmm… Well how about for starters it’s bloody mental. Supremely sinister and rendered in an unusual very idiosyncratic style, this is the work of British Artist Justin Todd. Something about it is strangely very contemporary, but in fact it dates from 1975 and so is actually slightly older than your site author.

Todd, an artist I’ve only just come across, is a classically trained illustrator he lectured Illustration at Brighton University in the 1960′s along side Raymond Briggs (The Snow Man, When The Wind Blows). Someone I’ve earmarked to revisit, for now you can read a little more on him here at arts.brighton.ac.uk.

The story by the way revolves around a highly addictive drug ‘Nightmare Blue’ whose users die without another hit… I’ll just point out I haven’t actually read any of the books featured here, so I’ll add a little snippet like this with each cover.

'Cinnabar' Peter Goodfellow 1978

‘Cinnabar’ Peter Goodfellow 1978

This is one of those slightly abstract airbrush type covers so popular in the 70′s,  the indeterminable sense of scale and swathes of cobalt blues lend an appropriate otherworldly theme. This is English artist Peter Goodfellow’s depiction of Cinnabar, a city at the centre of’ time.

The book is actually collection of short stories based around this would be futuristic utopia, I believe some which may of been printed in the legendary OMNI magazine which I’ve posted about way back when. Interestingly after forging a career Illustrating book covers, Goodfellow would move to become a highly regarded landscape painter in Scotland, that future path perhaps hinted at here by the covers distant snowcapped mountains.

Read a little more about Peter Goodfellow here.

'Frankenstein Unbound'  Art by Paul Bacon 1975

‘Frankenstein Unbound’  Art by Paul Bacon 1975

The cover of Brian Aldiss’s ‘Frankenstein Unbound’ comes complete with an appended $1 mark scrawled on the monsters temple. Ignoring the graffiti then, and this slick inked illustration is the work of American graphic designer and Illustrator Paul Bacon. Love the subtle shift in hues and the way the grained texture of the heavy watercolour paper comes though. This style is in fact very reminiscent of Micheal Foreman, who illustrated the original Erik the Viking book, that was featured here a little while back.

Again somewhat embarrassingly this was the first I’d actually heard of Paul Bacon, although I’m not entirely sure how as I am familiar with some of his work. Perhaps you are too? Bacon created the iconic first edition covers for some of the 20th century’s most important novels including Ken Kesey’s ‘One flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest‘, Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.’s ‘Slaughterhouse-Five‘ and the legendary ‘Catch 22‘ by Joseph Heller (love that book). Read a little more about Paul Bacon at Wikipedia.

A quick story synopsis: Time traveling 21st American Joe Bodenland finds himself with Byron and Shelley in the famous villa on the shore of Lake Geneva. More fantastically, he finds himself face to face with a real Frankenstein. Sounds pretty good, and indeed in 1990 was adapted to the big screen with no other than Roger Corman at the helm, the undisputed heavyweight champ of cult cinema. Frankenstein Unbound stars staring John Hurt, Bridget Fonda and Raul Julia check it at IMDB.

' The Incandescent Ones' - Adrian Chesterman

‘ The Incandescent Ones’ – Adrian Chesterman

This sinister looking chromed robotic figure is the work of Adrian Chesterman another artist who’s popped up here before. Chesterman, an American artist produced a series of these somewhat warped airbrushed covers for Penguin Science Fiction during the late 70′s and Early 80′s. It’s a look that’s quite distinguishable being characterised by exceptional costume styling and rendered with just the right amount of highlighting sheen. Above is a fine demonstration of these traits, and as with all Chesterman’s covers is underpinned by a deep love for the subject matter.

Also of note is that despite being a (one assumes) being from the future, it’s also impossible to escape the influence of the present or what is now the past. As such Chesterman’s work contains subtle visual clues that reflect the times; a touch of Disco here, a splash of ‘Simon Says’ and of course the inevitable Starwars references.

Definitely a favourite of mine, check out the complete set of Adrian Chesterman cover’s over at the excellent Penguin Science Fiction website.

A quick note the on the book itself and this one sounds perhaps targeted towards a younger adult demographic. A young art student receives a cryptic message that is to lead him on to a series of startling adventures…

'Times Last Gift'  Art by Peter Tybus  1975

‘Times Last Gift’  Art by Peter Tybus  1975

A rainbow coloured somewhat fauvist cover from Peter Tybus this one dating from 1975. The story, if you hadn’t of guessed revolves around time travel.

Tybus is something of a Sci-Fi-O-Rama enigma, and there is little or no digital footprint of him beyond a series of magazine and book illustrations dating from the 1970s. Indeed the top search result listed by google is in fact a Sci-Fi-O-Rama’s past feature on him. Anyway there’s always alot of love here for his iridescent style that’s also reminiscent of the work of  David Pelham, of course, also a Penguin Sci-Fi Cover illustrator.

If you do have more info on Peter Tybus do let us know, it’d be great to one day run an expanded feature…

'R is for Rocket' cover art by Ian Miller

‘R is for Rocket’ cover art by Ian Miller

A collection of Short Stories penned by Ray Bradbury. This cover is the unmistakable work of British illustrator and blog favourite Ian Miller, featured a good few times before. Millers work is a demonstration in ornate crafting finished with laser guided precision and is juxtaposed into chaotic compositions swathed with wild gothic stylings. This is the definition of frenetic, never a moment will your eye rest upon Ian’s work, such is demonstrated above. Also take note of a hawk-eyed passion for architectural and geometric detailing.

Miller doesn’t really do Sci-fi or Fantasy, the work is simultaneously both and neither, and of course is all the better for it. If you are unfamiliar with his work and intrigued (you should be) why not have a browse back through past entries or check his official website ian-miller.org.

'The Menzentian Gate' cover art Barbara Remmington

‘The Menzentian Gate’ (Year Unknown)

The Menzentian Gate is a fantasy novel, penned in 1958 and is part of whats known as the Zimiamvian Trilogy. The saga fact loosely linked to Eddison’s more famous work ‘ The Worm Ouroborosfeatured here way back in 2008.

The cover is by Barbara Remmington an American artist and Illustrator most famous for her Ballatine Books first edition covers for Lord of the Rings. It’s a colourful style of work reminiscent perhaps of that Bayeux tapestry  mode of visual story telling, and busy composition loaded with clues and character. Certainly captures the ethos of what a fantasy book should like, and the Dragon/Serpent looks fantastic.

Der Himmel uber Pern Cover

Der Himmel über Pern

From the dragon that devours its own tail to one thats shrouds an astronaut. Lets not beat about the bush here, this cover is tarnished by some feeble typesetting. But lets clone stamp that out of the way and concentrate on the artwork. Judging by the creatures sinister almost demonic appearance I’m guessing this could be the work of Wayne Barlowe or possibly Chris Achilleos, both masters in the art of fashioning evil looking winged reptilian beasts. It may well be however that it’s the work of someone else entirely, please post if you know. Aslo are dragons actually reptilian?  If I ever see one I’ll be sure to ask.

The German title translates as ‘The Skies of Pern’ a science fiction novel by the American-Irish author Anne McCaffrey. The story is just one of a series set on the mythical world of Pern and the concept of Dragon Rider’s, hence the cover art.

Farmer Giles of Ham (Swedish Cover)

‘Gillis Bonde från Ham’ (Farmer Giles of Ham) – 1970 by Rolf Lagerson

Another Dragon here, and a swerve towards decidedly lighter material. This is cover for a 1970 Swedish edition of the  J. R. R. Tolkien children’s book ‘Farmer Giles of Ham’. Tolkien originally wrote the story of Farmer Giles and his encounters with the wily Dragon Chrysophylax (great name) back in 1939 but it wasn’t to be published until 1949.

Lovely illustration from Rolf Lagerson which I came across by chance whilst pin-balling around various Pinterest boards. Drilling through to source to uncover ‘s wonderful Illustration blog ‘Animalarium‘. Animalarium put simply is a a vast resource of illustrated animal imagery, best summarised by it’s own simple strapline: “Animals as an endless source of creative inspiration”.

Check it out: www.theanimalarium.blogspot.co.uk. Also worth a look a collection of Rolf Largerson’s Illustration at Flickr.

Dean Ellis - The Tar-Aiym Krang

‘The Tar-Aiym Krang’ art by Dean Ellis 1972

Back up to Sci-Fi and here’s another taster from a prolific genre Illustrator, the late Dean Ellis. I believe this is the seventh appearance on Sci-Fi-O-Rama of an Ellis Illustration, all are characterised with a highly distinctive almost classical style, similar in many ways to the work of space art pioneer Chesley Bonestell. Beautiful renderings of distant worlds and the inky black star-fields the lay within, Ellis’s work is a wash with soft hues and subtle shading.

If it’s your first time viewing a Dean Ellis cover I certainly recommend taking the time to study more
www.sci-fi-o-rama.com/category/artist/dean-ellis

The book itself; ‘The Tar-Aiym Krang’ sounds like your classic space opera fare, and centres on young orphan and thief  known as ‘Flinx ‘ who comes cross a fabled star map…

Empire Of The Atom

‘Empire of The Atom’ 1974 (Designer Unknown)

An interesting typographic solution with a smart colour schemes forms the cover for a 70′s edition of Van Vogt’s 1957 novel. Empire of the Atom caused something of a stir at the time due to similarities with Robert Graves’s Claudius stories. Having read neither, I couldn’t possibly pass judgement! Slick graphics though proving minimal jacket sleeves such as these can have just as much impact…

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Well once again, what started out as mini post idea and a brief scan through Flickr has completely snowballed out of control into another creaking behemoth type article. This one is playing out like a Sci-Fi-O-Rama Who’s Who, and there’s of course many more artists I can and will feature. However, I’m slightly conscious of post length and attention spans, not least of which my own! so I’m going to sever the post here and conclude with a Part 2…

In the Meantime, be sure to check out the following resources….

The Art of Penguin Science Fiction

Sci-Fi-O-Rama Flickr Favourites

Flickr Sci-Fi Books Pool

Back soon….

 

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