Silence Television

Silence Televison

It’s been a couple of months since my last article so time to unplug the cryogenics, thaw out and get writing. A few special features lined up this month, including an exclusive interview with a certain Swedish Sci-Fi Illustrator, but to start with here’s a close up on the super slick work of Peruvian Designer and Illustrator Gianmarco Magnani, better known by his monicker Silence Television.

Before compiling this post I did attempt to get in touch with Gianmarco to help contextualize this article and get an insight into his inspired, idiosyncratic approach, also no response as of yet, but hopefully we can hook something up in the future. In the meantime here’s a rundown of this stunning artwork with my thoughts.

Above: Browse Gianmarco’s portfolio ( and you’ll notice several recurring themes; glamorous biker chicks, rock paraphernalia, deconstructed retro motor vehicles and bikes. What really stands the style apart is not just the ultra-tight rendering, or the faultless craftsmanship but a real meticulous eye for detail that binds beautifully – a rare pedigree that almost looks effortless. This image shows up all those traits, and with such confidence, one

To The Moon (Time-Life Records)

To The Moon - Time Life Records

Something of a special feature here, original photography scanned from the breathtakingly beautiful ‘To The Moon’ (Time-Life 1969) an audio and visual chronology that documents NASA’s Mercury, Gemini and (of course) Apollo projects. ‘To The Moon’ includes 6 doubled sided 12″ Vinyl’s full of famous radio transmissions and interviews, plus an accompanying 190-page slip casebook, and that’s the focus of this post. Many thanks to Craig for the temporary loan!

The first thing that strikes when flicking through ‘To The Moon’ is the muted palette and hues of the colour photography. Bathed in a loving technicolour warmth, the imagery empowers the feeling of not just peering into the past, but through into another world, like suddenly everything could spring to life. What’s also unusual is the obscure nature or relative rarity of content, as you might expect in running and researching this blog I’ve mined many resources from this period, but scanning here presented gem after perfectly preserved gem.

A quick disclaimer on the scans, I’ve tried my best to match the tones of the book, but

Jonathan Zawada - notes-n-tokes

Johnathan Zawada - Populations

Jonathan Zawada - herakles dog

Johnathan Zawada - Vallery 2011

Johnathan Zawada - it-was-on-earth-i-knew-joy

Johnathan Zawada - Six Pack

Johnathan Zawada - gunboat willy-no type

Above sits a wonderful cross-section of art, illustration and design, not the work of an agency, collective or duo but in fact products of just one individual, Sydney based artist and designer Johnathan Zawada. I first came across Jonathan’s work whilst perusing the phenomenal inspiration repository that is (macro mode). As you will know the quality of the curation there is exceedingly high, each feature generally astonishing, however, I was particularly drawn to the spectacular, otherworldly iridescence of

Eduardo Paolozzi

Eduardo Paolozzi

Eduardo Paolozzi

Eduardo Paolozzi

Eduardo Paolozzi

Eduardo Paolozzi

Eduardo Paolozzi

Eduardo Paolozzi

A selection of work from the late Scottish sculptor and artist Sir Eduardo Paolozzi (7 March 1924 – 22 April 2005).

Paolozzi has always been a favourite of mine, particularly his beautifully composed, ultra-vibrant graphic screenprints. This post was sparked when I recently picked up a copy of “Paolozzi” a 1999 paperback publication that gives a chronological overview of Eduardo’s work. Here is the back page synopsis, note that I’ve embellished this slightly, altering present to past tense.

Eduardo Paolozzi (of Italian descent) was one of the major figures of postwar British art: A father of Pop Art a creator of key icons of

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