NSF (1) – Aurora Australis

NSF (1) – Aurora Australis

Aurora Australis

Aurora Australis

Aurora Australis

Aurora Australis

Aurora Australis

A selection of five galactic vista’s featuring the phenomenon ‘Aurora Australis‘ dancing high above the South Pole Telescope at Amundsen-Scott Station, Antarctica.

The Aurora Australis is the Southern Hemispherical equivalent of the Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights. Auroras occur when Solar Wind carrying charged particles from the Sun enter the upper atmosphere and are accelerated through Earth’s magnetic field. The Southern lights are less witnessed than there Northern counterpart, mainly due to the fact there’s much less inhabited land at high southern latitudes.

Read more about Auroras here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora_(astronomy)

The photos are taken from the National Science Foundation (NSF) website’s multimedia gallery which is fantastic source of high res imagery, from Galactic Panorama’s to renderings of Computational Fluid Dynamics – suffice to say there’s some pretty trippy stuff, well worth a look: http://ow.ly/kabe

Photography by Keith Vanderlinde, National Science Foundation / U.S. Antarctic Program. Hi-Res versions of these shots are at:

Vincent Fournier – Space Project

Vincent Fournier – Space Project

Vincent Fournier - Space

Vincent Fournier - Space

Vincent Fournier - Space Project

Vincent Fournier - Space

A lonely, fragile explorer traversing a world of cold desolation…

These spectacular landscapes are the work of French Artist/Photographer Vincent Fournier, taken from his “Space Project” Series. I’m not sure on the exact location here but this type of arid terrain is known as ‘Badlands’ or simply ‘Badland’, basically a landform created by the wind/water erosion of soft sedimentary rocks and clay-rich soils. Often this occurs in flash flooding when a years precipitation happens overnight.

Famous Badlands include: Hell’s Half Acre (Wyoming USA, used as a location for the 1997 movie Starship Troopers),  Bardenas Reales (Navarre, Spain) and New Zealands Putangirua Pinnacles.

See the more from the Space Project set at http://www.vincentfournier.co.uk/ originally spotted via FFFFound.com.

Lynx catching Snowshoe Hare

Lynx and Snowshoe Hare

A Snowshoe Hare falls victim of it’s classic enemy, the Lynx.

This haunting image was achieved remotely with the use of a a tripwire and was photographed by Ed Cesar, somewhere deep in the snowy wilderness of Alberta.

Prints are available via sciencesource.com, here’s a direct link http://images.sciencesource.com/preview/10079275/3R5273.html

Originally scanned from ‘The American North Woods / The Worlds Wild Places‘ form the Time-Life Series 1972 / 1988 seventh Reprint. I own a few of these books, purchased from a local Oxfam. They contain pretty much everything you need to know about each “wild place” and are packed with stunning landscape and wildlife photography. However none quite so dramatic as the above shot.

If you’d like to read more on how Ed Cesar was able to capture this stunning moment on film there is double page feature on his work that ran in the November 1966 edition of Popular Science Magazine.  View at Google Books.

Alberta native Ed Cesar worked a was a pioneer and advocate in the development and adoption of humane trapping standards. He started photographing wildlife and writing articles for magazines in 1959. Moving onto film Ed directed 10 documentaries, and