Nasa 1172 Pictures

Nasa 1172

Nasa 1172

Nasa 1172

Nasa 1172

Nasa 1172

Nasa 1172

Sci-Fi-O-Rama reader and fellow blogger Parker Mason got in touch this week with a link to his recently created, mammoth-sized Flickr Gallery “Nasa 1172”. Literally translated that’s 1172 incredible images of Nasa’s manned and robotic endeavours in the exploration of space. As you can imagine with over 1000 shot’s there’s plenty of variety, I’ve concentrated on picking a small selection of video graphics and diagrammatic Illustrations. Some notes then on the chosen images:

Top: Not exactly sure which Probe/Satellite this is – If you know please post a comment.

2nd Top: I’m guessing this captioned Illustration shows how a comet’s tail starts to form on approach toward the inner solar system.

3rd Top: A diagram showing the voyage of “Ulysses” a joint NASA/ESA probe launched back in 1990.

Bottom 3:

McMurdo Station Antarctica

Sunset at Mcmurdo Station

Ok so something of a different post – real world – a 21st-century frontier town glowing in the Antarctic twilight.

This photograph is of Antarctica’s largest settlement & it’s logistical hub, the US administered “McMurdo Station” at its peak home to over 1,200 residents…

I picked this image for a couple of reasons, firstly because anything to do with the icy wastes of Antarctica fascinates me! and secondly, because it looks very much like a recently “terraformed” world in the mould of a certain James Cameron film…

Also of note, that is an active volcano in the background; the 3,794 meters high Mount Erebus http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Erebus here’s another excellent shot that gives a real sense of it’s mass http://bit.ly/5hC69I the nearby neighboring New Zealand research station “Scott Base” (seen on right) is approx 3 miles from McMurdo…

Read more about McMurdo at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McMurdo_Station Photo is via the National Science Foundation http://www.nsf.gov

Full Moon (1)

Full Moon (1)

Full Moon

Full Moon

Full Moon

Two scans from the 1999 300mm squared Hardcover Publication “Full Moon” a photographic odyssey to the Moon and back, featuring a selection of 128 images, just a fraction of NASA’s 32,000 pictures from the Apollo Missions. Full Moon is a superb coffee table book brimming with simply breathtaking shots documenting arguably mankind’s greatest ever achievement, no detail is spared: blast off, rocket separation, crater vistas, Earthrise, moon buggies, remote cameras etc, etc. If you have even a casual interest in space then this is a must read, available on amazon.com here: http://ow.ly/zgoO

Details on the featured images…

Top: Apollo 15; Dave Scott manipulates collection tongs at Spur Crater – Photo: Hassleblad 70mm Black and White Negative by Jim Irwin, August 1971

Middle: Apollo 12, Alan Bean at Sharp Crater – Photo: Hassleblad 70mm Black and White Negative by Charles Conrad, Novemeber 1969

Bottom: The Sahara desert at the orbital altitude of 200 miles, this circular feature is “Irdehan Marzuq” located in Libya Photo: Hassleblad 70mm Transparancey by Richard Gordon, Gemini 11 Sept 1966

Simen Johan – Until the Kingdom Comes

Simen Johan – Until the Kingdom Comes

Simen John

Simen John

Simen John

Simen John

Simen John

Simen John

I’ve been running Sci-Fi-O-Rama seriously for over a year now and have gathered together and annotated a fairly wide range of material totalling over 200 posts (thanks for all the support!). Obviously some of the featured work I have a fondness for more than others as I’m sure you do to…

What I’m getting at is that this post then – the work of Swedish Artist Simen Johan – is, bar none, is my absolute favourite, I could simply stare at his haunting art for hours, it’s both disturbingly eerie and majestically uplifting, firing a range of emotions. You may also notice that I’ve tagged this with Horror, Sci-Fi and Fantasy – and you might think what is SF about this work? well, personally I’ve always seen the medium as spanning far beyond its conventional preconceptions of ray-guns, flying saucers and trans-morphing robots. Science Fiction is not just future gazing