McMurdo Station Antarctica

Sunset at Mcmurdo Station

Ok so something of a different post – real world – a 21st-century frontier town glowing in the Antarctic twilight.

This photograph is of Antarctica’s largest settlement & it’s logistical hub, the US administered “McMurdo Station” at its peak home to over 1,200 residents…

I picked this image for a couple of reasons, firstly because anything to do with the icy wastes of Antarctica fascinates me! and secondly, because it looks very much like a recently “terraformed” world in the mould of a certain James Cameron film…

Also of note, that is an active volcano in the background; the 3,794 meters high Mount Erebus http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Erebus here’s another excellent shot that gives a real sense of it’s mass http://bit.ly/5hC69I the nearby neighboring New Zealand research station “Scott Base” (seen on right) is approx 3 miles from McMurdo…

Read more about McMurdo at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McMurdo_Station Photo is via the National Science Foundation http://www.nsf.gov

Full Moon (1)

Full Moon (1)

Full Moon

Full Moon

Full Moon

Two scans from the 1999 300mm squared Hardcover Publication “Full Moon” a photographic odyssey to the Moon and back, featuring a selection of 128 images, just a fraction of NASA’s 32,000 pictures from the Apollo Missions. Full Moon is a superb coffee table book brimming with simply breathtaking shots documenting arguably mankind’s greatest ever achievement, no detail is spared: blast off, rocket separation, crater vistas, Earthrise, moon buggies, remote cameras etc, etc. If you have even a casual interest in space then this is a must read, available on amazon.com here: http://ow.ly/zgoO

Details on the featured images…

Top: Apollo 15; Dave Scott manipulates collection tongs at Spur Crater – Photo: Hassleblad 70mm Black and White Negative by Jim Irwin, August 1971

Middle: Apollo 12, Alan Bean at Sharp Crater – Photo: Hassleblad 70mm Black and White Negative by Charles Conrad, Novemeber 1969

Bottom: The Sahara desert at the orbital altitude of 200 miles, this circular feature is “Irdehan Marzuq” located in Libya Photo: Hassleblad 70mm Transparancey by Richard Gordon, Gemini 11 Sept 1966

Simen Johan – Until the Kingdom Comes

Simen Johan – Until the Kingdom Comes

Simen John

Simen John

Simen John

Simen John

Simen John

Simen John

I’ve been running Sci-Fi-O-Rama seriously for over a year now and have gathered together and annotated a fairly wide range of material totalling over 200 posts (thanks for all the support!). Obviously some of the featured work I have a fondness for more than others as I’m sure you do to…

What I’m getting at is that this post then – the work of Swedish Artist Simen Johan – is, bar none, is my absolute favourite, I could simply stare at his haunting art for hours, it’s both disturbingly eerie and majestically uplifting, firing a range of emotions. You may also notice that I’ve tagged this with Horror, Sci-Fi and Fantasy – and you might think what is SF about this work? well, personally I’ve always seen the medium as spanning far beyond its conventional preconceptions of ray-guns, flying saucers and trans-morphing robots. Science Fiction is not just future gazing

NSF (1) – Aurora Australis

NSF (1) – Aurora Australis

Aurora Australis

Aurora Australis

Aurora Australis

Aurora Australis

Aurora Australis

A selection of five galactic vista’s featuring the phenomenon ‘Aurora Australis‘ dancing high above the South Pole Telescope at Amundsen-Scott Station, Antarctica.

The Aurora Australis is the Southern Hemispherical equivalent of the Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights. Auroras occur when Solar Wind carrying charged particles from the Sun enter the upper atmosphere and are accelerated through Earth’s magnetic field. The Southern lights are less witnessed than there Northern counterpart, mainly due to the fact there’s much less inhabited land at high southern latitudes.

Read more about Auroras here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora_(astronomy)

The photos are taken from the National Science Foundation (NSF) website’s multimedia gallery which is fantastic source of high res imagery, from Galactic Panorama’s to renderings of Computational Fluid Dynamics – suffice to say there’s some pretty trippy stuff, well worth a look: http://ow.ly/kabe

Photography by Keith Vanderlinde, National Science Foundation / U.S. Antarctic Program. Hi-Res versions of these shots are at:

Vincent Fournier – Space Project

Vincent Fournier – Space Project

Vincent Fournier - Space

Vincent Fournier - Space

Vincent Fournier - Space Project

Vincent Fournier - Space

A lonely, fragile explorer traversing a world of cold desolation…

These spectacular landscapes are the work of French Artist/Photographer Vincent Fournier, taken from his “Space Project” Series. I’m not sure on the exact location here but this type of arid terrain is known as ‘Badlands’ or simply ‘Badland’, basically a landform created by the wind/water erosion of soft sedimentary rocks and clay-rich soils. Often this occurs in flash flooding when a years precipitation happens overnight.

Famous Badlands include: Hell’s Half Acre (Wyoming USA, used as a location for the 1997 movie Starship Troopers),  Bardenas Reales (Navarre, Spain) and New Zealands Putangirua Pinnacles.

See the more from the Space Project set at http://www.vincentfournier.co.uk/ originally spotted via FFFFound.com.