Larry Niven – Ringworld / Protector

Ringworld

Protector

Here we have two artist’s interpretation’s of “Ring and Bubble Worlds” hypothetical megastructures first theorised by physicist Freeman Dyson and popularised by legendary American Sci-fi author Larry Niven. The Ringworld concept was of course recently re-imagined and brought to the fore as the backdrop for Bungie’s seminal First Person Shooter “Halo”.

The top cover is interesting – though admittedly it’s visually descriptive, the scale is completely wrong – Larry Niven’s artificial world is about 600 Million miles in circumference – this would mean here that the central star is tiny!  Also on closer inspection the topography is actually stuck on sideways and the whole thing looks more like a giant Zoetrope!…. anyway nitpicking aside, as a cover it still rocks

A “Dyson Ring” is the most simple form of a “Dyson Swarm” basically a vast collection of satellites strung around a star to capture solar energy, this differs slightly to the ring’s described in Niven’s novel and Halo which are actually artificial worlds. Freeman Dyson envisaged these concepts as a solution to meet the needs of a long-lived technological civiliastions energy requirements –

Barnaby Ward (2)

Barnaby Ward

Barnaby Ward

Barnaby Ward

Barnaby Ward

Barnaby Ward

A selection of Illustration by Barnaby Ward, taken from his portfolio website http://somefield.com

Barnaby’s drawing’s feature a playful mix of pseudo Manga babes, weird looking robots, freaky animal-humanoids,  and often mad tech fetishism – all rendered in a loose but  frenetic style that blends svelte Fashion Illustration ala Jason Brooks (Puscha/Head Kandi) and obsessive detailing ALA Katsuhiro Otomo (Akira).

With regards to the examples featured here, I’ve tried to feature a good cross-section from a straightforward classy Fashion Illustration at the top; 2nd down is is similar but warped with an Alien Fishhead! – it’s this mix of innocuous and the bizarre the really give Barnaby’s work an edge.  Third and Fourth are pure stream of consciousness doodling and have a more stylised vivacious feel. The fifth and final example is a slick demonstration of a character study – I picked this especially as I know how tricky it can be to

The Fox

The Fox

Another post, another vintage book cover!

This timeless, stunningly beautiful Illustration is taken from a Bantam Books edition of D. H. Lawrence’s Novella “The Fox” – though the artwork was originally produced for the 1967 movie adaption starring Kier Dullea, an actor most famously known for playing a certain Dave Bowman… So there’s your Sci-Fi connection.

D. H. Lawrence’s story of sexual identity centre’s around a female couple struggling to run an isolated farmstead with its small chicken population under the constant shadow of a raiding fox. The couples life is then disrupted further with the return of Paul, who used to live and work on the farm, and his offer to help out and put things straight… One of the film’s taglines is “The Fox … symbol of the male”

Though I haven’t read the book I have seen the screen adaption which I’m guessing these days would rank as fairly hard-to-find, it’s  a great film, low-key and very subtle with chilling winter cinematography.

Not a sniff of an original trailer anywhere to be found, so here’s a link straight to imdb.com as always look out for spoilers!!  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0062990/

Just for the